College of Doctoral Studies scholars among most visible at 2020 TQR11 conference

College of Doctoral Studies scholars among most visible at 2020 TQR11 conference

Pictured above top row far right: Erik Bean, Ed.D. and LauraAnn Migliore, Ph.D. Lower row left to right: Senator Michael MacDonald, D.H.A., Kristina K. McGaha, D.M., and Wendy Aoki, D.B.A., and James Lane, Ed.D.

By Erik Bean, Ed.D.
Associate University Research Chair
Center for Leadership Studies and Organizational Research

Imagine conducting a quantitative content analysis. The first step is to operationalize the variables you want to measure. Now imagine a research team defining visibility at a conference. That team may operationalize visibility as the quality, notoriety, and frequency of individuals present within the conference plenary. If we were to apply this definition to find the individuals from the one school most prominently visible at The Qualitative Report conference dubbed TQR11 held at Nova Southeastern University from January 15-17, 2020, the University of Phoenix College of Doctoral Studies (CDS) scholars would be culled out.

According to TQR11 program manager out of 261 people who showed up to present at TQR11 of the 451 listed in the plenary summaries including individuals with multiple presentations, 51 listed were from CDS and 17 UOPX scholars were on hand and visible. With topics ranging from the leadership style of Theodore Roosevelt to AIDS orphan experiences to a narrative inquiry of hurricanes and school educational ethics in the Virgin Islands to Black educational experiences with racism, the themed “Contemporary Qualitative Research” conference found University of Phoenix a formidable scholarly proponent championing a variety of systemic and community issues and possible solutions that can change people’s lives. Below is a complete list of the UOPX scholars who appeared in the plenary with their presentation titles below their names:

Michael MacDonald, University of Phoenix

  1. A Qualitative Study of Women to Assess Coping Mechanisms for Exercise Adherence to Curtail Obesity

Grace Gwitira, University of Phoenix

  1. Corporate Responsibility, AIDS Orphan Experiences, and Affluency - A Phenomenological Study Reflection

Erik P. Bean, University of Phoenix
LauraAnn Migliore, University of Phoenix

  1. An Autoethnography of Two Scholars Who Developed a Framework on Prudent Leadership Using a Quote from President Theodore Roosevelt

Cheryl Burleigh, University of Phoenix
Andrea Wilson, University of Phoenix
Danielle Sixsmith, University of Phoenix

  1. Mobile Technology and Teaching in High School Classrooms: Do Boundaries Exist?

Jim Lane, University of Phoenix
Shaquanah Robinson, University of Phoenix
Belinda Moses, University of Phoenix
Alyncia Bowen, University of Phoenix
Denise Rattigan, University of Phoenix

  1. Hurricanes, Schools, and Educational Ethics in the Virgin Islands: A Narrative Inquiry

Mansureh Kebritchi, University of Phoenix
Ryan Rominger, University of Phoenix
Mark McCaslin, University of Phoenix

  1. Student Success in an Online Practitioner-Oriented Doctoral Program: A Grounded Theory Study

Patricia B. Steele, University of Phoenix
Elizabeth A. Young, University of Phoenix
Jack Avella, University of Phoenix

  1. Educators’ Perceptions of Ethics in Virtual Educational Environments (VREs): A Qualitative Narrative Inquiry

Cheryl Burleigh, University of Phoenix

  1. Encouraging High School Females to Enroll in the Physical Sciences: A Reflection Twenty Years Later

Patricia Akojie, University of Phoenix
Marie Smith, University of Phoenix
Karen Johnson, University of Phoenix
LaShonda Reid, University of Phoenix
Barbra Bowers, University of Phoenix

  1. Experiences with Racism: Narratives from Black Educators

Myrene A. Magabo, University of Phoenix

  1. Leveraging One's Profession to Enhance Skills and Scholarships

Elizabeth A. Johnston, University of Phoenix
Mansureh Kebritchi, University of Phoenix
Jim Lane, University of Phoenix

  1. Developing an Agenda, Skills, and Presence in Online Research: A Case Study

Elizabeth A. Johnston, University of Phoenix
Mansureh Kebritchi, University of Phoenix
Jim Lane, University of Phoenix

  1. Inspirational Professional Development: How Online Adjunct Faculty Re-Engaged in Scholarship and Evolved Into Scholarly Leaders

Kristina K. McGaha, University of Phoenix
Diana Hart, University of Phoenix
Wendy Aoki, University of Phoenix

  1. A Mixed Methods Exploration of Completion Expectations of Online Doctoral Students

Patricia B. Steele, University of Phoenix
Liston Bailey, University of Phoenix
Margaret Kroposki, University of Phoenix
Myrene Magabo, University of Phoenix
Cheryl Burleigh, University of Phoenix

  1. Ethics in Virtual Educational Environments (Vres): Designers Perceptions

Cheryl Burleigh, University of Phoenix
April Lash, University of Phoenix
Teresa Lao, University of Phoenix

  1. Teachers Awareness in Identifying Microaggressive Behaviors Within the K-12 Classroom

Elizabeth A. Johnston, University of Phoenix
Cheryl Burleigh, University of Phoenix
Drena Valentine, University of Phoenix

  1. Curating and Using OER-Immersive Multimedia Materials for Deep Learning: A Proposed Framework

Mansureh Kebritchi, University of Phoenix
Ryan Rominger, University of Phoenix
Karen Johnson, University of Phoenix
LauraAnn Migliore, University of Phoenix

  1. Using Decision Based Learning for Teaching Qualitative and Mixed Methods Designs: Methodologists’ Self-Reflections

Jim Lane, University of Phoenix
Yvonne Hefner, University of Phoenix
Karyn Scott, University of Phoenix
Sally Everts, University of Phoenix
Ramona Phillips, University of Phoenix

  1. Ethical Challenges of Educators in Rural Schools: A Narrative Inquiry

Delving deeper into the content analysis findings revealed that Cheryl Burleigh yielded a total of five presentations that kept her busy each of the three conference days. While that is an impressive number, Ryan Rominger conducted six the previous year. Of course, quality is not judged by quantity alone. Each of the presenters were peer reviewed and each contributed equally to the value of this annual conference, one that has allowed its accompanying periodical, The Qualitative Report journal to become the fourth most popular top tier qualitative research journal in the world. Congratulations to each of the University of Phoenix CDS presenters. 2020 was a most impressive year, the likes of visibility not often seen by most schools.

 

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