PART II.The Psychological Shift: Building Resilience Amidst Managed Concern- 3 ways to resource during a crises

PART II.The Psychological Shift: Building Resilience Amidst Managed Concern- 3 ways to resource during a crises

One of the major impacts on our psyche is the “fear” reaction. It challenges the potential for resilience in many ways. Elements that promote the contents of fear and anxiety are provoked by many things in our environment. Scarcity, living with unknowns, vulnerability and lack of options (trapped animal effect) ushers in emotional reasoning that overrides logic, thus competing for cortical real estate in the landscape of thinking processes. But in many ways, the challenges to extremes and the Rapid Onset of Change (ROC) can allow us to also uncover and engage one another in more beneficial and important ways. Approaching extreme situations by developing our possibilities and incorporating  a shift to a “managed concern” perspective is one positive way of engaging our environment.

In this installment of Part II of the Psychological Shift, we will examine the ideas of orientingadaptive-bridging, and renegotiation using managed concern as a process and goal for encouraging new ways of thinking and instituting “internal resilience resourcing” during a time of rapid change.

Our brain plays a seemingly important and challenging role during crises events. To better understand it, it is important to see how the brain is divided into array of complementary components that today are still being examined and uncovered for their potentials. Psychology, and most especially neuropsychology researchers, are concerned with our physiognomy and its interplay with the mind. These same researchers have studied the divisions of the brain and each element therein for its derivative functions in variations of descriptives that help us understand how we react and respond to things and their point of origin, so that we can begin to understand the complex linkages and learn why we do the things we do.

The brain and body likewise respond to important cues in the environment and their potential for threat or harm, especially within the sudden and rapid onset of an unanticipated event. This might evidence itself most especially with events like the sudden loss of a job, breaches to family routine that are extreme, sudden loss of family or friends, abrupt changes to daily living circumstances, and/or the potential for immediate threat or harm. Our physiological reactions to such events are governed by specific parts of the brain. According to Peter Levine, in his book “Waking the Tiger,” the involuntary and instinctual parts of the brain and nervous system look very much like those of other mammalian and reptilian animals. Levine describes the triune brain as composed of a reptilian brain (instinctual), the mammalian or limbic brain (emotional), and the human brain (rational) [1]. The same parts of the brain activated by fear because of trauma or even sudden or rapid change that upset daily life routines are the same parts of the brain activated within most of the animal kingdom. Levine’s premise is in learning from other animals and their ability to move through a “fluid adaptation” process rather quickly. Most animals allow the discharge of energy following a traumatic event perhaps through a predatory encounter they survive, to move through their body, in a sense, “shaking it off” and moving on after the threat of harm has been eliminated. If we take that a step further, looking at how and what we orient to, what captures our focus and using some adaptive bridging techniques to modify that process, we can renegotiate our experiences and most especially, modify how we “see” the rapid onset of change during the COVID-19 era. The opportunity to work on how we perceive events can teach us a tremendous amount about ourselves and provide great resource states we can use for the rest of our lives. A good place to begin is to look at what Abraham Maslow founded in the world of psychology through the lens of a hierarchical structure of “needs” known today as Maslow’s Hierarchy.