Culturally Responsive Teaching Knowledge and Culturally Responsive Practices of Online Faculty

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Keri L. Heitner, PhD

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Keri Heitner
First and Last Name: 
Keri L. Heitner

History

Member for
5 years 10 months
Phone: 
(413) 549-0154
Current and Ongoing Research Interests: 

Current Research: Culturally Responsive Teaching Knowledge and Practices of Online Faculty (research in progress as a fellow with the CEITR). Can’t do it! When Coaches’ Worldviews Challenge Their Interventions (research in progress with Pauline Fatien at Menlo College; our paper has been accepted for presentation at the Western Academy of Management 2015 Conference in March 2015) Qualitative exploratory case study about the phenomenon of worldviews and coaching practice through the angle of ethical dilemmas. The objectives are to identify the nature of the ethical dilemmas that stem from coaches’ worldviews, what approaches the coaches use to resolve these dilemmas, and the supports they drawn upon. Our research questions are as follows: Central research question: What major ethical dilemmas do coaches in the United States face as a result of their worldviews, and how do they resolve these dilemmas? SR1: What are the different types of major ethical dilemmas stemming from their worldviews that U.S. coaches encounter? SR2: What approaches (e.g., strategies and techniques) do U.S. coaches use to resolve ethical dilemmas stemming from their worldviews? SR3: What resources do U.S. coaches use to resolve ethical dilemmas stemming from their worldviews? SR4: To what extent do these resources aid U.S. coaches in resolving ethical dilemmas stemming from their worldviews? SR5: What kind of additional supports (resources, people, training, supervision, etc.) do U.S. coaches identify that could be beneficial to aid them in resolving ethical dilemmas they face stemming from their worldviews? The proposed research builds on the few studies about the role and influence of worldviews in the helping professions (Mitchell, 1996; Ibrahim, 1985). By identifying the nature of the ethical dilemmas U.S. coaches face stemming from their worldviews and the way they resolve them, the results may have valuable practical and pedagogical implications for both the coaching and consulting professions. The proposed qualitative exploratory case study will involve collecting and analyzing data from multiple sources to explore and generate a rich understanding of an existing situation. An exploratory case study design is appropriate given the limited prior exploration of the complex topic with the specific population. Using an exploratory case study design to explore the complex situation of the ethical dilemmas that U.S. coaches encounter as a result of their worldviews might generate findings for further research on the topic. The different types of ethical dilemmas reported and the various approaches for resolving them will comprise the units of analysis. The results will include several composites of typical dilemmas faced and approaches used to resolve them. Composites will be used to protect confidentiality. Data will be collected in two rounds. The first round will consist of a Web-based questionnaire consisting of 17 open-ended questions to be completed anonymously. The second round of data collection will involve a semi-structured interview to be conducted via Skype. The interview protocol for the semi-structured interview will be created based on the major patterns and themes identified from the analysis of the questionnaire. Scholarly interests: service delivery research in education, health, business, public health, and human services. Diversity-related topics, ethical and gender issues, and business/entrepreneurship.

Cultural responsiveness is important to engage and meet the needs of diverse students in higher education. Faculty and the students they teach online often come from different worlds. Cultural differences between faculty and their students can pose important challenges affecting the quality and efficacy of teaching and learning. Using an assessment instrument to measure faculty’s culturally responsive teaching knowledge and practices in teaching and advising students of color, military, LGBTQ, religious minority, international students, etc., we examined differences in cultural responsiveness knowledge and culturally responsive practices by education sector and degree level taught. The findings may contribute to addressing a knowledge gap in higher education. The results may have important implications for online faculty training, professional development, mentoring, and support.

Can’t do it! When Coaches’ Worldviews Challenge Their Interventions (research in progress with Pauline Fatien at Menlo College; our paper has been accepted for presentation at the Western Academy of Management 2015 Conference in March 2015)

Qualitative exploratory case study about the phenomenon of worldviews and coaching practice through the angle of ethical dilemmas.  The objectives are to identify the nature of the ethical dilemmas that stem from coaches’ worldviews, what approaches the coaches use to resolve these dilemmas, and the supports they drawn upon.  Our research questions are as follows:

Central research question: What major ethical dilemmas do coaches in the United States face as a result of their worldviews, and how do they resolve these dilemmas?

SR1: What are the different types of major ethical dilemmas stemming from their worldviews that U.S. coaches encounter?

SR2: What approaches (e.g., strategies and techniques) do U.S. coaches use to resolve ethical dilemmas stemming from their worldviews?

SR3: What resources do U.S. coaches use to resolve ethical dilemmas stemming from their worldviews?

SR4: To what extent do these resources aid U.S. coaches in resolving ethical dilemmas stemming from their worldviews?

SR5: What kind of additional supports (resources, people, training, supervision, etc.) do U.S. coaches identify that could be beneficial to aid them in resolving ethical dilemmas they face stemming from their worldviews?

The proposed research builds on the few studies about the role and influence of worldviews in the helping professions (Mitchell, 1996; Ibrahim, 1985).  By identifying the nature of the ethical dilemmas U.S. coaches face stemming from their worldviews and the way they resolve them, the results may have valuable practical and pedagogical implications for both the coaching and consulting professions.

The proposed qualitative exploratory case study will involve collecting and analyzing data from multiple sources to explore and generate a rich understanding of an existing situation.  An exploratory case study design is appropriate given the limited prior exploration of the complex topic with the specific population.  Using an exploratory case study design to explore the complex situation of the ethical dilemmas that U.S. coaches encounter as a result of their worldviews might generate findings for further research on the topic.  The different types of ethical dilemmas reported and the various approaches for resolving them will comprise the units of analysis. The results will include several composites of typical dilemmas faced and approaches used to resolve them. Composites will be used to protect confidentiality.

Data will be collected in two rounds.  The first round will consist of a Web-based questionnaire consisting of 17 open-ended questions to be completed anonymously. The second round of data collection will involve a semi-structured interview to be conducted via Skype.  The interview protocol for the semi-structured interview will be created based on the major patterns and themes identified from the analysis of the questionnaire. 

 

 

Publications: 
Dissertation Field Guide
Scholarship in administration: Connecting with the university culture
Building consensus on defining success of diversity work in organizations
Chapter 9: Women in business
Family businesses
The role of career colleges: Implications for serving racial and ethnic minority students
The great divide: Worker and employer perspectives on current and future workforce demands
Current and future language demands in the workplace: Proficiencies and gaps
Women of courage: Leadership experiences of female Nigerian immigrants in Texas
Advertising, aimed at women
Entrepreneurs
Finance (women in)
Global gender gap report 2011
Internet/technology entrepreneurs, women
Microenterprise development
Race, ethnicity, and religion in the workplace
The rhetoric of gaydar research: A critical discourse analysis study.
Book review [Review of the book, Women’s career development through the lifespan: An international exploration, by J. Bimrose, M. McMahon, & M. Watson (Eds.)].
Culturally responsive teaching knowledge and practices of online faculty.
Are Generation Y nurses satisfied on the job? Understanding their lived experiences.
Student evaluation ratings: Examining predictive relationships between students’ ratings and course satisfaction.
Book review of Women’s career development through the lifespan
University of Phoenix Courses: 
RES/711
RES/722A
RES/723
DOC/721R
DOC/732R
DOC/722
DOC/733
DOC/734
DOC/740R
DOC/736A
RES/741
DOC/737
DOC/738A
RES/746
Professional Bio: 
Keri Heitner is a research psychologist and writer focusing on service delivery research and program development in education, health, business, public health, and human services. Dr. Heitner has created and obtained more than $100 million in public and private funding for dozens of research, education, and training projects in special, adult and vocational education, career re-entry, after school programs, services for persons with disabilities, and health and human services delivery, technology, and the arts. Dr. Heitner also designs and implements needs assessments and program and project evaluations and regularly conducts independent and collaborative research on diversity-related topics, ethical and gender issues, and business/entrepreneurship.
Degrees Completed: 
Doctoral Degree
Ph.D., Psychology
City University of New York Graduate School
1986
Masters Degree
M.Phil., Psychology
City University of New York Graduate School
1985
Masters Degree
Psychology
Graduate Faculty, New School for Social Research
1982
Bachelors Degree
Psychology
State University of New York, Stony Brook
1978
Academic Appointments: 
Honors and Awards: 
Faculty of the Year, School of Advanced Studies
Residency Faculty of the Year, University of Phoenix School of Advanced Studies, July 2011
Faculty of the Month
University of Phoenix School of Advanced Studies Faculty of the Month for December 2011
Creating Excellence in Doctoral Learning Award
Creating Excellence in Doctoral Learning Award for Recognition of Contributions to SAS Learners in Research, University of Phoenix School of Advanced Studies, October 2010.
Citation of Recognition
Citation of Recognition for serving on the Steering Committee for the University-wide Conference, The University of Massachusetts and the Building of a Pluralistic System of Higher Education: Strategies for Combating Racism and Promoting Civility, Univers
Professional Education: 
Professional Suffix: 
PhD
Primary College or School: 

Faculty and the students they teach in the online environment often come from different worlds, whether social, ethnic, cultural, geographical, or other contexts. Cultural differences between faculty and their students can pose important challenges that affect the quality and efficacy of teaching and learning. Cultural responsiveness in teaching is an important component of meeting the needs of diverse students and in engaging diverse students in higher education. A review of the literature revealed little is known about the culturally responsive teaching knowledge and practices of majority online faculty members who teach diverse students.  The purpose of this quantitative comparative study is to create and pilot test an assessment instrument for online faculty members designed to measure culturally responsive teaching knowledge and culturally responsive practices in teaching and advising students of color, military students, LGBTQ students, religious minority students, international students, etc., and then administer the resultant instrument to a larger sample in order to examine differences in cultural responsiveness knowledge and culturally responsive practices by education sector and degree level taught. The findings may contribute to addressing a knowledge gap in higher education. The results may have important implications for online faculty training, professional development, mentoring, and support. 

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