Pecha Kucha At AECT - Something Different In The World Of Peer Reviewed Presentations

Pecha Kucha At AECT - Something Different In The World Of Peer Reviewed Presentations

In late October I and two of my colleagues had the opportunity to present at the annual convention for the Association for Educational & Communications Technology (AECT) held in Las Vegas along with many other University of Phoenix faculty members. Before I go on I would like to thank Dr. Sandra Nunn for her excellent blog on the “happenings” at the convention.   For this blog I would like to share our personal experiences at the convention doing a Pecha Kucha (chit chat in Japanese) presentation.   First you should know what you are getting into before you get into it.  What do I mean?  When the call for papers came out from AECT we decided to put in for two peer reviewed presentations in case one was rejected.  In short, hedging our bets. You can guess what happened both were accepted!  Okay, we could live with that and should feel proud that we had two presentations that were accepted. The first presentation was a traditional concurrent session paper. No problem!

Our second presentation was known as a Pecha Kucha (for correct pronunciation see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4O3Cgw91UrI).  The AECT Pecha Kucha presentation required three panel participants.  In this case I presented along with Dr. Mansureh Kebritchi, and Mr. Martin La Pierre (Doctoral Candidate).  Our topic was Knowledge Based Artificial Augmentation\ Intelligence Technology: The Next Step In Academic Instructional Tools.   View our presentation PDF

For those of you that are unfamiliar with a Pecha Kucha presentation each panelist is required to produce 20 slides for a total of 60 slides. Not too bad you might say.  But here is the fun part!  You have only 20 seconds for each slide and it is timed, automatically transitioned to the next slide, and there is no leeway to go over the time limit that in this case is 6 minutes and 40 seconds.  In addition, a Pecha Kucha is supposed to be heavily graphic based and you are to produce minimal, and refrain from talking from, bullet points (better known as “Death by PowerPoint”).  What this means is that there is a lot more development time because it takes an enormous amount of time and effort to find the right graphics to go with each slide, and remember you have to find a lot of graphics for sixty slides!  Also, with Pecha Kucha presentation you need to do a lot of rehearsing to make sure you cover everything in 20 seconds for each slide. This means not talking too much or too little for each slide. 

Would I personally do it again for another conference?  I can only speak for myself and say I probably would because all said and done I enjoyed it but I will have to be honest and say for the first one it was a bit stressful.  If you are interested in finding more about Pecha Kucha there is a Pecha Kucha organization (www.pechakucha.org/).  In addition, there are numerous You Tube Videos on Pecha Kucha.

Comments

Mansureh Kebritchi's picture Mansureh Kebritchi | November 7, 2016 12:44 pm MST

Thank you Dr. Crowe for reflecting on our Pecha Kucha presentation. It was a different and interesting way of presenting. I enjoyed the new format of presenting. In addition, the topic is very timely and attractive in the field of education.  Great Work!

Sandra Nunn's picture Sandra Nunn | November 9, 2016 11:48 pm MST

Thank you for your great post, Dr. Crowe.  I thoroughly enjoyed attending this presentation and listening to the great information shared by you, Dr. Kebritchi, and Martin La Pierre.  Fascinating presentation and very informative!!  It was also the first presentation I've ever seen done in the Pecha Kucha format.  You all did a fantastic job!!

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Dale Crowe

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