January 2020 CEITR Publications and Presentations

January 2020 CEITR Publications and Presentations

CEITR Publications and Presentations: January 2020


Congratulations to all of those who have published or presented during the month of January, 2020. Here are a few of the publications and presentations we know of.

 

Member:  Paula Miller

Publications Accepted:

 

Connelly, J., & Miller, P. (2020). A Conceptual Framework for SMART Applications in Higher

Education: Emerging Research and Opportunities. Hershey, PA: IGI-Global.

 

A Conceptual Framework for SMART Applications in Higher Education: Emerging Research and Opportunities is a critical scholarly publication that explores how the brain acquires and processes information to turn information into knowledge and the role of SMART technology and how it combines and integrates visual and aural data to facilitate learning. The book also discusses ways to apply what is known about teaching to how the brain operates and how to incorporate instructional design models into the teaching and learning process. Highlighting various topics such as neurogenesis, smart technologies, and behaviorism, this book is essential for instructional designers, online instruction managers, teachers, academicians, administrators, researchers, knowledge managers, and students.

 

Hub Profile: https://research.phoenix.edu/research-centers/center-educational-and-ins...

 

Member:  Patricia Akojie

Presentations:

 

Akojie, P., Smith, M., Johnson, K., Reid, L., & Bowers, B. (2020, January 14-17). Experiences

with racism: Narratives from black educators.  Paper Presentation at the Qualitative

Report Conference.  Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

 

The purpose of the study is to explore and investigate the professional experiences of black educators with racism in school cultures and the way those experiences have shaped their professional practices. Based on the findings, the research team recommended a conceptual framework for the improvement of race relations within school environments that may be beneficial to educational leaders.

Hub Profile: https://research.phoenix.edu/patricia-akojie/presentation/experiences-ra...

 

Member:  Jennifer James

Publications Accepted:

 

James, J. L. (2020). Students as stakeholders: Understanding expectations can increase student

retention. Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory, & Practice, 0(0). 1

23. doi: 10.1177/1521025119898844

 

This research article presents new data on expectations and persistence among online college students. Data were collected from 205 participants, 24‚Äâyears or older, enrolled in at least one course in a series of online courses. Two factors were identified as significant correlations with student persistence: (a) difficulty level of course content and (b) time commitment.

Hub Profile: https://research.phoenix.edu/users/jennifer-l-james

 

 

Member:  Marie Smith

Presentations:

Akojie, P., Smith, M., Johnson, K., Reid, L., & Bowers, B. (2020, January 14-17). Experiences with racism: Narratives from black educators. . The Qualitative Report 11th Annual  Conference, Nova Southeastern University, January 2020 inFort Lauderdale, FL.

 

The purpose of the study is to explore and investigate the professional experiences of black educators with racism in school cultures and the way those experiences have shaped their professional practices. Analysis of the data collected reveals how black educators' experiences with racism in both their personal and professional lives impact their professional practice including relationships with colleagues, administrators, parents and students.

 

 

Member:  Cheryl Burleigh

 

Publications Published Online or In Print:

Hartman, R., Burleigh, C., & Lane, J.  (2020). School leaders' reflective blogs inspire systemic change: A narrative inquiry. In H. Tran, D. A. Smith, & D. G. Buckman (Eds.), Stakeholder engagement: Improving education through multi-level community relations (pp. 59-76), Lanham, MD: Rowan & Littlefield.

Five school leaders who took part in the Shadow a Student Challenge Project discovered the potential for meaningful and long-lasting change when a school culture is founded on awareness, relationships, and change.  Leader empathy for student experiences inspired hacks (small innovations) generating a positive cultural shift within each school environment. Researchers used a narrative inquiry approach to understand and portray the leaders‚Äô stories as shared in their reflections.  Blogging was an integral aspect of the leadership experience and provided feedback and support within an international community of practice.  The study revealed positive implications for school public relations when administrators communicate school changes to their communities.

Presentations:

 

Bottomley, K., Burleigh, C., Migliore, L., & Bean, E. (2020, January). Using the VAE-model to develop sustainable leadership in education by passing the torch to Millennials. Hawaii International Conference on Education. Honolulu, Hawaii.

The VAE-model (vision, alignment, and execution) provides a strategic framework to educational leaders to identify the next generation of leadership.  Building on the concept of succession planning and sustainable leadership Boomer leaders can pass on their knowledge for high impact conversations to reshape perspectives, refine purposes, and redirect resources for alignment with desired outcomes.

Bottomley, K., Burleigh, C., Schumacher, J., & Lindsay, P. (2020, January). Brave. Honest. Focused: Faculty and student engagement in online doctoral programs.  Hawaii International Conference on Education. Honolulu, Hawaii.

The Lead Faculty Area Chair model used in the College of Doctoral Studies, University of Phoenix, provides faculty and students with experienced leaders who engage in faculty governance and instructional leadership. Lead Faculty Area Chairs demonstrate academic excellence and expertise in their disciplines and serve as mentors for faculty and students. Personalized coaching topics for faculty and students includes effective communication skills, teaching and learning, assessment, and doctoral studies that is brave, honest, and focused.

Burleigh, C. (2020, January). Encouraging high school females to enroll in the physical sciences: A reflection twenty years later. The Qualitative Report 11th Annual Conference. Fort Lauderdale, FL.

The role of an educator is to encourage students to pursue academics to their full potential. When non-traditional role models in professions typically dominated by men are introduced to an urban high school setting, the effect on the female high school population produced an environment  encouraging enrollment in the physical sciences and pursuing non-traditional careers. This narrative analysis revisits the original participants and their stories gives hope that positive interventions can have a lasting impact on the population served. By experiencing the professions and educational pathways of role models in non-traditional careers, the students were able to reflect on the encounters and effect positive change in their course selections, college majors, and careers

Burleigh, C., & Wilson, A. (2020, January). Mobile technology and teaching in high school classrooms: Do boundaries exist? The Qualitative Report 11th Annual Conference. Fort Lauderdale, FL.

Within the field of education, teachers are continuously urged to implement technology, inclusive of social media, into the classroom to support student learning and to improve channels of communication between the school, home, and the school community (Callison, 2015). While the premise of technology as a communication and teaching tool is ideal, the practical applications of such technology is not.

Burleigh, C. , & Lao, T. (2020, January). Teachers‚ awareness in identifying microaggressive behaviors within the K-12 classroom. The Qualitative Report 11th Annual Conference. Fort Lauderdale, FL.

Microaggression may be seen as a potential problem in schools since administrators and teachers may unintentionally perpetuate policies, beliefs, and ideas that appear unfair to diverse groups of students based on ethnicity, race, and culture due to unconscious or implicit bias. While bullying is known and recognized as an act of violence (Rigby & Smith, 2010; Waasdorp, Pas, Zablotsky, & Bradshaw, 2017) the awareness of microaggression as an abusive behavior is not as well known, recognized, or addressed within schools (Sue, 2010). The movement of microaggression is to bring awareness in how individuals communicate with persons within or outside a diverse community.

Johnston, E., Burleigh, C., & Valentine, D. (2020, January). Curating and using OER-Immersive multimedia materials for deep learning: A proposed framework. The Qualitative Report 11th Annual Conference. Fort Lauderdale, FL.

Researchers have determined that visual learning allows for faster and deep comprehension of complex models, relationships, and procedures (Onyesolu, Nwasor, Ositanwosu, & Iwegbuna, 2013) compared to other learning modalities. When compared to print mediums, the visual nature of popular culture offers rapid and almost immediate dissemination of information (Brantley, 2015) and is easily available for the generation born at the turn of the 21st century.  Students, who are members of Generation Z prefer to watch a process and then replicate it rather than using text based resources to learn (Genota, 2018; Seemiller & Grace, 2017; Shatto & Erwin, 2017). Most Generation Z students (59%) indicated a strong preference for YouTube to learn and gather information, while less than half (47%) indicated a preference for textbooks as a source of learning (Global Research & Insights, 2018). 

Steele, P., Baily, L., Kroposki, M., Magabo, M., & Burleigh, C. (2020, January). Ethics in virtual education environments (VRes): Designer‚ Perceptions. The Qualitative Report 11th Annual Conference. Fort Lauderdale, FL.

Developers expressing ethical concerns regarding various issues in VR products with current interest in holding accountability for ethical design and use of virtual reality (VR) products in virtual environments (VREs) is on the rise (Adams et al., 2018; Ramirez, 2019).

The need exists for additional study regarding ethics in VR technology (Madary & Metzinger, 2016). Using narrative inquiry qualitative design, the current study will examine designers‚ perceptions on the ethical issues surrounding the development and use of Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) applications in educational environments.

Burleigh, C. (2020). Strategic mentorships encouraging high school females to enroll in the physical sciences: Twenty Years Later. Hawaii International Conference on Education. Honolulu, Hawaii.

The power of strategic mentorships can be facilitated by educators. When urban female high school students are introduced to non-traditional role-models, professions typically dominated by men, the results produced an environment of encouraging enrollment in the physical sciences and pursuing non-traditional careers. This narrative analysis revisits the original participants and their stories shared gives hope that positive strategic interventions can have a lasting impact on the population served.

Hub Profile: https://research.phoenix.edu/users/cheryl-burleigh

 

Member:  Shaquanah  Robinson

Presentations:

 

Lane, J., Bowen, A., Moses, B., Rattigan, D., Robinson, S. (2020, January). Hurricanes, schools, and educational ethics in the virgin islands and puerto rico: A narrative inquiry. Paper presented at the The Qualitative Report Conference, Fort Lauderdale, FL.  

This narrative study was to understand and describe the perceptions of educators and adult former students as they experienced schooling following two devastating hurricanes in Puerto Rico or the U.S. Virgin Islands in September 2017. The researchers listened as students and educators expressed the challenges faced after experiencing the devastation of Hurricane Irma and Maria. The educators shared their experience of applying personal and professional ethic, and reengaging in formal education practice following the storms.
 

Member:  Margaret Kroposki

Presentations:

 

Steele, P., Bailey, L., Kroposki, M., Magabo, M., & Burleigh, C. (2020, January). Ethics in virtual educational environments (VREs): Designer‚Äôs perceptions. Presented at the 2020 The Qualitative Report 11th Annual Conference,  Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL. 

The purpose of this qualitative narrative inquiry study was to understand the designers’ perceptions of ethics when they design VR/AR products for educational purposes. Data were collection from on-on-one interviews with self-described VR/AR instructional designers who were members of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology. Findings may provide an in-depth understanding of the importance and use of ethics in developing VR/AR products for use in educational settings.

Hub Profile: https://research.phoenix.edu/users/margaret-kroposki

 

Member:  Myrene Magabo

Presentations:

 

Magabo, M. (2020, January). Leveraging one‚ profession to enhance skills and scholarship. A Workshop and Presentation at the 2020 The Quality Report Conference, Nova Southeastern University Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U.S.A.

This workshop presentation underscored the importance of Reflective Action Research and how educators can leverage the richness of data from within the teaching-learning environment and engage in scholarship in strategic ways. The workshop engaged  attendees or participants in generating insights and various perspectives on qualitative research approach using Reflective Action Research frameworks and identified possible research topics or projects, as well as outline some strategic approaches to Qualitative Research.

Hub Profile: https://portal.phoenix.edu/profile/mmagabo

 

Member:  Ryan Rominger

Presentations:

 

Kebritchi, M., Rominger, R., & McCaslin, M (2020). Student success in an online practitioner-oriented doctoral program: A mixed-methods theory study. The Qualitative Report 11th Annual Conference, Nova Southeastern University, January 2020, in Fort Lauderdale, FL.

The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the nature of student success, contributing factors, and ways to improve student success for nontraditional doctoral students in an online practitioner-oriented doctoral program. The data were collected from the doctoral graduates, administrators, and faculty members. The data strands were joined during the analysis phase to establish a theory which may assist understanding of the phenomenon. The survey responses, demographic questionnaire responses, and interview transcripts were entered in Dedoose. The data analyzed through iterative stages of analysis using memoing, first level analysis (structural, descriptive, in vivo, process, and holistic coding), and second level analysis (pattern coding, theoretical coding). The findings included a negative correlation between GRIT and time to completion (the higher the GRIT, the less time to completion), expansion of the definition of student success based on faculty or alumni roles, and a deeper understanding of the personal and institutional/program characteristics which contribute to student success.

Rominger, R., & Kebritchi, M (2020). Integrating decision based learning into research methods instructional webinars: A program evaluation. The Qualitative Report 11th Annual Conference, Nova Southeastern University, January 2020 inFort Lauderdale, FL.

The Research Methodology Special Interest Group at the University of Phoenix was created to help train doctoral faculty and students on the use of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods designs. For many faculty the webinar trainings act as professional development, and for students it helps them ground their doctoral studies in the theory and application of a particular method. Now in its second year, the SIG incorporated Decision Based Learning (DBL) theory and software as a way to structure the webinar trainings. DBL postulates that experts in a field have decision points they work through when making a decision, with each decision affecting the next. Often that decision process remains covert for students, with students focused instead on learning theory and content. By using DBL those decision points become overt, thus helping students move beyond theory into practical application. A select group of the Research Methodology SIG webinar leaders have applied DBL theory and integration of a unique software package into our research methods webinars to facilitate teaching of research methods. This presentation addresses the program evaluation results after an 8-month use of DBL in the Research Methodology SIG. The program evaluation itself included field notes and summative evaluation by the co-leaders of the SIG, surveys completed by each of the webinar leaders who used the DBL theory and software, and a focus group of the webinar leaders wherein they discussed the benefits and challenges of using DBL in this unique online, webinar based instructional setting.

Kebritchi, M., Rominger, R., Jonhson, K., & Migliore, L. (2020). Using Decision-Based Learning for Teaching Qualitative and Mixed Methods Designs: Methodologists‚ Self reflections. The Qualitative Report 11th Annual Conference, Nova Southeastern University, January 2020 in Fort Lauderdale, FL.

The purpose of this panel presentation is to share the experiences and insights of the panel members about using Decision-Based Learning model for teaching qualitative and mixed methods designs within a framework of a Research Methodology Group (RMG) at a University in Southwest of United States. The panelists are RMG methodologists. The mission of RMG is to generate deeper understanding about application of existing and emerging research designs and to support scholarship across the university. Experiential learning serves as theoretical framework of RMG and seeks to put knowledge to work and bridges theory and practice cultivating a transdisciplinary community of practice. Decision-Based Learning (DBL) is an innovative pedagogy that help learners conditionalize their knowledge and make criteria-based decisions by going through series of interrelated decisions experts make to frame the problems. These decisions fan out like a decision tree, with general, high-level decisions at the beginning and then increasingly detailed decisions toward the end. As the learners go through series of decision-making instructions are provided step by step to support learners make right decisions. DBL was developed by Teaching and Learning Center at Brigham Young University. RMG methodologists adopted DBL approach to teach qualitative research designs more effectively. Consistence with TQR 2020 theme of “Contemporary Qualitative Research” the panelists will share their experiences, reflections, and challenges of using a DBL as a contemporary approach to enhance participants’ knowledge of the qualitative and mixed methods designs. Such insights are valuable for adopting DBL and enhancing teaching research designs.

Hub Profile: https://research.phoenix.edu/users/ryan-rominger

 

Member:  Patricia Steele

Presentations:

 

Steele, P. B. (2020, January). Educators’ perceptions of ethics in virtual educational environments (VREs).  P. B. Steele (Chair), E. Young, J. Avella.  The Qualitative Report 11th Annual Conference “Contemporary Qualitative Research”, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida USA.

The purpose of the qualitative inquiry study is to understand teachers‚ perceptions of the ethical and safety issues that are inherent in placing students in virtual realities.  Seven teachers were interviewed who have used or who are interested in using virtual educational products into the educational environment. Educators were  interviewed as to their perceptions of ethics in VREs.  Findings showed five specific areas relating to the subject: psychological safety, social safety, physical safety, ethical morality, and teacher responsibilities. 

Steele, P. B. (2020, January). Ethics in virtual educational environments: Designers’ perceptions.  P. B. Steele (Chair), M. Kroposki, M. Magabo, C. Burleigh. The Qualitative Report 11th Annual Conference “Contemporary Qualitative Research”, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida USA.

The purpose of the qualitative narrative inquiry study was to interview designers/developers of VR/AR products as to their perceptions of ethics of design and use of virtual products designed for educational purpose.  Qualitative narrative inquiry study was used to collect data as VR/AR designers and developers tell their stories and share their perceptions and perspectives of ethics in creating virtual products.  Self-described instructional designers and programmers for VR/AR products who have had at least three years‚ experience.  Themes emerging from the narrative inquiry study included: Educational, Awareness, Relevance, Social, Ethical Considerations.  Sub-themes: Students Centered, Engagement, Standards Based also were noted.

Hub Profile: https://research.phoenix.edu/user/3946/edit

 

 

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